A Tale of Two Sheep.

[This post is for the women.  As always, commentary, correction, and other thoughts from the men will be gratefully accepted.]

How do we teach our children what we are learning here (and by here, I mean this collection of blogs encompassed by the mano-, ortho-, and reactionary-spheres)?

In our home, we have opted not to have television and to limit our children’s screen time.  We’ve also recently removed their i-POD Touches from them; they can now only use them between certain hours and they must stay in one of the common areas of our house to do so.  This means that our children are sometimes a bit sheltered, yet I want to make sure they are prepared to deal with the world as it really is, not as I wish it were.

The way that I have handled this is with story-telling.  We love telling stories in our house and often take turns making up tales for one another.  It’s highly enjoyable, but a wise parent can also use story-telling to be instructive without preaching.  I would like to describe a story I made up and told to my girls last year.

In the story, there were a group of sheep in a sheepfold in a barnyard.  They were owned by a farmer who was kind to them, who saw to their every need and many of their wants.  Their only job was to grow wool and produce lambs for the farmer, so they had a lot of free time to do as they pleased and were happy, contented little ewes.

One day,  a wolf sidled up to the sheep pen and started whispering to some of the sheep.  He told them their life looked dull.  He told them how much more fun it was outside the sheepfold.  He told them that he had a wonderful time being free and that it was such a shame that the poor ewes had to obey the farmer and grow wool for him.  How terribly unfair that he gets their wool for free!  The wolf said he would never make the sheep do anything like that for him if they were ever to come out and play with him.

The sheep were timid at first, but a few started to listen.  They looked at the wide world outside the pen, and it looked enticing – all that freedom!  And the sheep started to whisper about the farmer, that he was using them unfairly and not letting them have any fun.  They decided they would be much happier if they escaped from the farmer altogether and went to play with the wolf.

And then one day, the farmer didn’t latch the barnyard gate securely.  The wolf pointed that out to the sheep; he himself did not open the gate but only mentioned it slyly so as not to put the ewes on guard.  When the ewes saw that the gate was ajar, they shrank back a little at first.  But then one particularly brazen little sheep wiggled her fluffy self through it, and out into the wide world she went.  Once she had escaped, the others began to follow the naughty sheep out, a few at a time.

As the story continued, I described how the ewes had fun at first frolicking with the wolf, but then when it was dinner time, there was nothing to eat because they had always relied on the farmer for this, and the wolf suddenly was nowhere to be found. And then it grew dark and they were afraid and had no barn for shelter.  And then finally, the wolf returned, only this time he brought more wolves with him…

After awhile, a few of the surviving sheep in my story stumbled back to the barnyard only to find that the farmer has closed and locked the gate to keep the few sheep who had remained in the barnyard safe.  They could no longer get back in and they were sorry they had ever listened to that deceiving wolf and left the peaceful safety of the fold and the farmer’s protection.

Now, to adults, the story may sound simplistic, but my girls were fascinated by it.  They made up all kinds of different endings for the story, trying to figure out a way for the sheep to get back into the pen.  Could they jump the fence?  Could they hang around looking fluffy and cute to see if the farmer would notice them?  Could they bleat and cry until help came?  And I told the girls, “The other sheep should not have followed the naughty, brazen one.  They should have stayed in the pen.  The moral of the story is don’t follow stupid sheep into destruction.”

I never thought of telling that story here until yesterday, when Cail Corishev made this comment:

For women trying to teach other women, it’s important to remember the herd instinct. I think many people who aren’t experienced with herd animals misunderstand what that means and think it means that women always follow the herd — always go with the majority. But that’s not quite right. The thing about a herd is that the entire herd will follow one animal who is willing to take the lead. If you’re trying to get a herd of sheep to go through a gate they’ve never entered before, sometimes they’ll just mill around in circles, acting as if they can’t even see the gate, until you’re exhausted from chasing them. But as soon as you can get one ewe to break off from the group and go through, the rest will charge after her at top speed.

I’ve seen similar behavior among women. If all the women in a group are doing the same thing, it’s very hard to get any one woman to go against them. But if just one woman will go her own direction — and look confident and happy and attractive to men while doing it — others will soon be drawn to imitate her, even though they’re still in the minority. I don’t think women realize they have this kind of individual power, because the fear of being that first one to break away is so strong; but one woman setting the right example can have a major influence on an entire group in a way that doesn’t really work between men.

I was floored by the fact that Cail had used the exact same imagery that I had used in the little fairy tale I had made up for my daughters, only in his story the sheep who has broken out from the herd by following the shepherd’s instructions is leading the other ewes back to safety rather than leading them into sin.  I was so struck by what he was saying because it exactly describes what a number of us ladies have been trying to do with our blogs.

We are trying to listen to our shepherds – and many of us are ultimately trying to listen to the Shepherd – so that we can find our way through the narrow gate.  And as we listen and stumble toward that gate, we are trying to lead the rest of the herd that’s milling about and not listening for the shepherd’s voice at all back to the safety of the sheep fold in the barnyard.

To be sure, we do it imperfectly.  We get lost in the weeds, we draw wrong conclusions, we might not always choose our words carefully.  Sometimes we get lost in talking about the ideal rather than the real, and sometimes we focus rather heavily on all the things we love and are grateful for about our husbands, but as Velvet put it (as only she can) in her outstanding post Every House I Can See From Here Is Glass:

I do not consider my family a personal accomplishment, but I do consider their accomplishments and goodness as individuals a source of righteous pride.  I like my life, adore my husband, enjoy a good bikini wax, and can cook like few women can.  I can balance the checkbook, hire a contractor, plan a party, dig a garden while giving my husband great head and pray the rosary all at the same time  - if that’s what my husband required … I’d do it, with pleasure, and I’d be good at it.  That’s not bragging, it’s simply true.

A nasty little feminist sheep led the flock out of the barnyard a long time ago.  Ladies, though we will be criticized and attacked for it, let us resolve to continue to listen to the shepherd and be the sheep that obeys, who dares to come out from the group and follow the shepherd through the gate so that the rest of the lost sheep who aren’t listening can see a way to get home, too.

More instructive story-telling can be found here:

Dalrock:

Edited to add: I am using the word sheep here allegorically not in the sense of The Sheeple (mindless, unquestioning followers of government propaganda) but rather in this sense:

All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the LORD has laid on Him the iniquity of us all. (Isaiah 53:6)

108 thoughts on “A Tale of Two Sheep.

  1. Lori Alexander

    So, so good SSM!!! Yes, we will be attacked and criticized for not following the herd but the only one we want to please is our amazing Shepherd and in the process, many others around us are pleased. Paul speaks often about following his example. We all are imitators of others. We need good, holy, and righteous people to imitate. We need salt and light. So few women have ever seen a godly marriage being modeled in front of them. It is such a great need in this day and age.

  2. Looking Glass

    If you want more story ideas, I’d give Proverbs a few reads, then construct some of the common themes into little stories. (Concepts get repeated, in slightly different contexts & forms, in different chapters)

    Heavy emphasis on the passages talking about “sweet” words (“like honey” in the literal translations), as we have a very, very verbal society, the focus needs to be on how to head off problems at the Verbal side, before they progress past that.

    [ssm: Thanks, LG, that's a really good suggestion.]

  3. The Woman Margery

    “Ladies, though we will be criticized and attacked for it, let us resolve to continue to listen to the shepherd and be the sheep that obeys, who dares to come out from the group and follow the shepherd through the gate so that the rest of the lost sheep who aren’t listening can see a way to get home, too.”

    What pains me is that the sheep have been out of the gate so long and the false messages so loud and clear about the shepherd and the gate that the way back is completely out of their view. Until, of course, someone shines a light on it.

    What is it to hold up a lantern in the dark?

  4. FuzzieWuzzie

    Loved the story. This bear does have a sentimental streak.

    [ssm: Thank you, FW. It's meant for children, of course, but then again I've been off course and then corrected by a simple story more than once as an adult...]

  5. sunshinemary Post author

    What is it to hold up a lantern in the dark?

    Indeed, it is our duty.

    No one after lighting a lamp puts it in a cellar or under a basket, but on a stand, so that those who enter may see the light. Luke 11:33

    Unfortunately, sometimes the person holding the lantern makes a very bright target of him- or herself. Hence the virulent nature of the feminist attacks on anti-feminist women.

    And this is the judgment: the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness rather than the light because their works were evil. John 3:19

  6. Caradoc

    I have a story idea myself. There was once a fine healthy little stallion. All the mares thought him fine but he only had eyes for one. In the passage of time they made plans as horses do to share a stall, to feed together, and maybe have a little colt of their own. One day the farmer led in someone new. He was a sleek black thoroughbred, magnificent and blooded. His great size overshadowed the other little horses. Our little stallion didn’t think much of it, but he noticed his mare was distant at feeding time. Over the next few weeks the problem got worse. She nipped at him several times, knocked his bucket over, and even tried to kick him one evening when he came into her stall. The observant farmer noticed this, and decided that two stallions were a problem. The next day, our little friend got a ride in the big silver trailer, never to be seen again. All the mares were happy, because now they had the thoroughbred to themselves. He of course was not as kind, or as gentle as what’s his name was, and he surely was not going to only have one mare, but nobody cared about that. The end.

    [ssm: Although the truth it conveys is appalling, nevertheless the clever way in which you phrased it made my lol at the end. But it was kind of a sad lol.]

  7. Farm Boy

    Cows are the same way. Get one going, and the others will follow. They also have a sweet deal: give milk for food and comfort.

    But in some ways they are different. A contented cow gives more milk. A non-contented desperate woman gives more milk.

  8. Farm Boy

    One more thing about cows — when they no longer give the milk, off they go to a magical place.

    There is probably a lesson in there somewhere.

  9. Farm Boy

    He of course was not as kind, or as gentle as what’s his name was, and he surely was not going to only have one mare, but nobody cared about that

    That works fine when you have the farmer subsidizing the whole thing

    [ssm: And don't forget about government farm subsidies. Those play a role, too.]

  10. jack

    I have long thought that female leadership will be what sets the tone for a return to sanity.
    Precisely because of this herd dynamic mentioned here.

    I think a lot of tattered, lost female sheep are milling around outside the fence, but they are not yet willing to admit fault, instead they have joined forces with the wolves in ridiculing any remaining sheep who wish to remain in safety.

    [ssm: Crazy, isn't it?]

  11. Farm Boy

    I think a lot of tattered, lost female sheep are milling around outside the fence, but they are not yet willing to admit fault, instead they have joined forces with the wolves in ridiculing any remaining sheep who wish to remain in safety.

    Furthermore, they have enlisted the services of cats to replace what the farmer used to do for them.

    Cats vs. Wolves. Not an even matchup.

  12. FuzzieWuzzie

    Farm Boy,
    Now why would a bear eat the sheep when that would bring down the wrath of the farmer?
    Seems to me that bears do leave livestock be.

    This a story for the women. What is needed for the lost little rams to find a way home where they are wanted.

  13. Farm Boy

    FW,

    Maybe you could update the Three Bears, with Baby Mama Bear, her Thugspawn, and her live-in boyfriend

  14. earl

    “They made up all kinds of different endings for the story, trying to figure out a way for the sheep to get back into the pen.”

    A noble white stallion who wanted to save the sheep from their own destruction because he secretly wanted the sheep to admire him instead of the wolves…perched himself along the fence and the sheep walked all over him to get back in.

  15. Farm Boy

    A noble white stallion

    And after he got them back in the pen, he raped them; because that is what white males do.

  16. Farm Boy

    The sheep walking out of the pen was the the first “slut walk”

    [ssm: ROFL! I think the sheep were already out of the pen by the time slutwalks started, but I appreciate the humor here anyway.]

  17. Professor Hale

    For what it’s worth that sheep mentality does not just apply to women. This was well described in a book called “Thinking Strategically”, that there are certain equilibrium points in social behavior that lead to stability and that once exceeded, the whole society goes the other way. Example: Speeding. When most people drive the posted speed limit, almost everyone will. But once about 25% of the population starts to speed, then very quickly almost everyone will speed.

    The “everyone does it” is a valid excuse because it accurately describes herd behavior. The task then for the Parent is to not just teach your children to not follow the herd, but to teach them wisdom so they will know when to follow, when to lead, and when to hide.

    [ssm: I loved that last line so much that I had to highlight it.]

  18. FuzzieWuzzie

    Farm Boy,
    In the modern scenario, Stepdad Bear did all he could but, Mama Bear was never stisfied. This won’t end well so, I’d better stop.

    In opposition to SSM’s story, I keep remembering the scene in Watership Down where the boy rabbits liberate the girl rabbits. Off went the girl rabbits with the boys, no questions, and no second thoughts.

    Presuming sheep in the wild are a tournament species, there is no place for the secondary males but to be outliers and act as wolf bait.

    It is a shame what our present culture has done to assortive mating.

  19. The Woman Margery

    The argument against this will go something like “But we’re not sheep!” completely missing the point and aiming to take down the argument simply because it’s not literal.

    [ssm: Undoubtedly you are correct. To that, I can only say this: Our Lord spoke in parables, and we are to follow the examples He gave on how to love, teach, and correct.

    And Jesus said, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” (Mark 4:9)]

  20. Professor Hale

    Further. Sometimes the wisdom of the herd is correct and there is safety in being being indistinguishable from the rest. Sometimes you just need to follow the other lemmings off the cliff because even though you don’t understand what they are doing, you trust them. And sometimes it is rational to not wish to be the only survivor. Sharing in your friends misfortunes is a virtue.

  21. The Woman Margery

    “And Jesus said, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” (Mark 4:9)”

    Jesus was an ableist and therefore he is completely invalid. Everything he said, ever.

    (Man, playing typical feminist progressive Millennial is getting harder and harder for me to do!)

  22. redpillsetmefree

    This a story for the women. What is needed is a story for the lost little rams to find a way home where they are wanted.

    PART 1
    There once was a mountainside full of rams. Rams of all wool types & sizes. Come mating time, the Chief Ram of course, always got his pick of the best ewe, but there were still plenty of ewes left for the other rams. Mainly because the ewes knew that even if they mated with the Chief Ram, he didn’t have enough resources to protect them all. Or the little baby sheep they gave him. So while they longed to be Mrs. Chief Ram, they knew that being Mrs. Beta Ram was better than nothing. Plus the Chief Ram had a tendency to ignore a ewe once he’d had his way with her. The ewes didn’t like or understand that either.
    One day a really funny looking ewe asked for the attention of all the other ewes. She was fat, her wool was trimmed funny around her, and the Chief Ram had always ignored her; but somehow, the other ewes gave her their attention. “I know a place,” she shouted brazenly, “where us ewes can mate with as many Chief Rams as we want. As often as we want, and it won’t cost us a thing!” The ewes were astonished at this saying, and wondered if it could be true. “But,” the funny looking ewe added, “you must burn your purity tags first!” and she lit a small fire right on the edge of the grazing field. A purity tag was a clip on the ewes’ ears, to show that their wool was clean & untainted. The beta rams were aghast at these sayings…but they didn’t really do anything to stop them.
    Well, they began to watch in horror as, one by one, the ewes started burning those tags off of their ears, and then followed the funny looking ewe off of their normal grazing land, and into the new & exciting promised place of unlimited ram mating. The Chief Ram just started laughing, because he knew that no matter what happened, nothing would change in his life. He’d have plenty of ewes either way.
    About 30-40 yards away, the newly liberated ewes were brought to a halt by their oddly shorn leader. She bleated a loud, brazen cry, and about eight huge Chief Rams appeared from the west, all with thick fur, shiny horns, heads held high, and they were all friends with the Chief Ram back at the original pasture. They started mating with these ewes something fierce. They even started taking turns, one Chief Ram after another, and the ewes squealed in ecstasy. They just knew that with all this mating going on, these incredible Chief Rams would stay around to feed and protect them, and the babies they made as well. About the time when the ewes were bleating in ecstasy at all the attention and mating from the Chief Rams, the funny looking ewe that led them there bleated another loud cry. Sounded very different from the first one.

    And this time, from the East, a huge pack of ravenous wolves appeared, running at top speed.

    to be continued….

  23. Maeve

    One of the reasons I’m so militant in encouraging my daughters to continue with their involvement in WBTS re-enactments is that it does require them to actually step outside of this current society and not just put on the garments, but be the young ladies of that time (1860′s); to adhere to the social mores and conventions – not to mention setting aside electronics and other modern distractions. I think the fact that they must adopt (even if temporarily) that far more traditional mentality is helpful to them – and actually, they love it and wish they could participate more often. My younger daughter wants to enlist her friends in these activities also and I’m hoping I can convince other parents that this is beneficial to their daughters on many levels.

  24. redpillsetmefree

    PART 2
    The ewes were completely caught off guard. They were still reeling in delight from their newfound freedom…but were shocked to discover that the Chief Rams were leaving after the wild mating. They weren’t even turning around to see what would befall the stunned(and no longer even close to pure) ewes. And then…
    The ewes looked up to see that the funny looking ewe that had led them there? Was actually a wolf herself. She threw off her ewe costume as the wolves lit up on the sheep, and began gobbling them up. The ewes were vulnerable as they were very sore from all the mating, and there were no beta rams around to fight the wolf pack for them. The funny looking ewe, now revealed as a wolf, had always told them that the Shepherd? Didn’t really know what he was talking about anyway, but the poor ewes realized that with no Shepherd or beta rams around to help them, their ideas about free mating had led them into a trap.
    Suddenly one of the younger ewes, one that had mated with the most Chief rams, realized that she, due to her age, was still fast enough to spring back to the original pasture. Some of the surviving ewes realized it too, and they all made a mad dash for the place they’d come from, with the screams of their dead sisters still in their ears.
    It took them a while(because the funny looking ewe wolf had not led them there directly the first time), so they were older when they returned, but they eventually saw the original pasture on the horizon. The beta rams had all been hanging out, laughing, and tackling each other….then one of them looked up to see the battered & torn ewes returning. The beta rams started counseling among themselves as to what to do. “Should we help them?” they asked. “No,” said one beta ram. “Look at them…what use are they to us now?” One big shiny white beta ram said “Of course we should help them…why, it’s our duty!” And another one said, “Besides, we haven’t mated in a while. Who knows what she did in that other pasture? She’ll still appreciate all of my help!” A lot of the beta rams started nodding in agreement, and with that, about half of them ran out to greet the grungy, bloodied, smelly surviving ewes.
    About that time the Shepherd came out and said, “My beta rams…you must ram up and help these ewes. They’re just ewes, they’re not responsible for what happened. Help them, and you will please me.” The beta rams grunted, and grudgingly trotted out to join their brothers in taking care of the prodigal ewes.

    Moral of the story?

    Only religion would make you think you have to take care of a used ewe. If you thought without the religious head, or the little head, you’d realize you were having more fun when you were single hanging out with your buds.

    The End.

  25. Matamoros

    as soon as you can get one ewe to break off from the group and go through, the rest will charge after her at top speed.

    There is a very old joke that goes:

    Johnny was asked by the teacher, “Johnny, you have 20 sheep in a pen, and one gets out. How many sheep do you have left.”

    Johnny answers straightaway, “None.”

    The Teacher says, “Johnny, you don’t know your arithmetic.” Johnny replied, “Teacher, you don’t know your sheep.”

    Any time a sheep gets out of the pen all of them will follow, if they are able.

  26. Professor Hale

    @ RPSMF,
    That’s not religion doing that. It is the weight of all of civilization. Harnessing the material strength of productive people to accomplish the wishes of the few in power (chief Ram or Shepard). And unless you have the middle name “Grizzly”, it’s always been that way, everywhere.

  27. Earl

    I’ve played tabletop role playing games with my kids. They are able to play, using dice and filling the character sheets at about 7. My 5 year old played once, and her character in the game was a child so that her bahaviors were somewhat explicable. We use a very easy dice rule system known as Risus, which can be found online for free. It is like Dungeons And Dragons lite. I write the stories and design the encounter myself, usually having a heavy focus on ethics, godliness, and leadership. My son plays a holy warrior and has many opportunities to be fully exposed to serious ethical scenarios in the total safety of my own tutelage. I often turn to random pages in the bible to design my encounters, taking moral and practical lessons from from scripture.

  28. Cautiously Pessimistic

    Having been raised on poisonous stories, I have a deep sense of mistrust towards any of them, regardless of content. They do not illustrate truths, but the author’s own beliefs.

    That said, I realize that’s an overreaction on my part. I can attest that stories are a powerful training tool, and can presumably be put to good use in a child’s upbringing.

    My only concern is that given the toxic sludge of stories we’re bathed in daily, I would value learning to counteract stories, rather than be exposed to good ones every once in a while.

    But that’s me. It’s issues like this that make me grateful I’m not raising kids.

  29. an observer

    There’s a bear in there.

    A big single mommy bear, occasionally joined by thug bear and resulting in thug-spawn cub bear.

    Mommy bear lives in ex-husband bears house (who lives alone jn a cave, on the wrong side of the river). He has to bring weekly picnic baskets for mommy bear to eat.

    What a charming family.

  30. Obliterated

    I LOL’ed at the part where they thought the sheep could “hang around looking cute and fluffy.” !! Ha ha Great story, Sunshine.

  31. FuzzieWuzzie

    Redpillsetmefree,
    Your story is not directly analogous to what is current. Today, they’re partying like crazy with Chief Rams. The ewes in the story had seen enough and were sorry they ever went there. The beta rams could take them back. The prodigal ewes aren’t about to do that again.

    Observer,
    Poor ex-Papa Bear! I’ll bet he’s getting skinny. Mama Bear is worried that the “picinic baskets” aren’t going to come if he goes “paws up”.

    You know what? It’s not the men who broke this. What I see is bafflement turning to bitternes.

  32. Rollo Tomassi

    This father must want his daughter to be miserable…gross, I would not marry a man who worships the ground I walk on…

    Women would rather be objectified than idolized.

  33. redpillsetmefree

    Redpillsetmefree,
    Your story is not directly analogous to what is current. Today, they’re partying like crazy with Chief Rams. The ewes in the story had seen enough and were sorry they ever went there. The beta rams could take them back. The prodigal ewes aren’t about to do that again.

    Big picture. Big picture.

  34. Velvet

    The wolves wouldn’t be so much of a problem if a decision hadn’t been made to muzzle and then kennel all the sheepdogs…

    This.

    Sometimes the wisdom of the herd is correct and there is safety in being being indistinguishable from the rest.

    This is something worth considering. Suburban life demands a certain “going along”, in order to lay low. Smile, nod, be agreeable, try not to get Knocked Out. Every one has to do that sometimes, but it’s very stressful on a day to day basis, I had no idea what a culture shock I would experience moving in from the country.

  35. Sis

    This makes me think of the father telling stories on “The Croods”

    Then of course, the daughter is smarter than the father and ends up proving him wrong. Have you ever noticed the trend in children’s shows to make children more intelligent than the parents? Harry Potter does the same thing, (love the shows) but they make the kids more intelligent than the adults.

  36. earl

    “It startled me. I scanned several of the countless articles about how to be sexy and sexual, when to bring him a beer versus a sandwich, and the ways to make him feel smart and superior.

    And I got angry.”

    Sounds like a male feminist to me.

    If a little lamb took that advice above…that puts her head and shoulders above the rest of the sheep.

  37. Just Saying

    “it’s important to remember the herd instinct”

    Hey, it has has been integral to my happiness. I am convinced that this is why women want a man that has been with a lot of women. Sure, they can say, “you’re a man-whore” – fine by me. That is advertising in my book – spread that word around to all of your girlfriends, especially the younger ones, and I’ll get an E-mail, or a text from several of them wondering why so many women are interested. (What does he do to get so many?) Women are so easy to manipulate. This is why, having a beautiful woman on your arm – is the BEST way to guarantee that a LOT of women will be interested in you – every woman wants to compete with her, and HATES to think they “missed out” – and YOU are what they are competing over. Of course, it has NOTHING to do with you – it’s what they do. It’s that herd instinct…. Gotta love it… (I liked the allusion to “little ewes”… So tender and moist. Yummy.)

    Of course, this is also why divorce comes in groups – one woman divorces her husband, and all of the others think she has a better life, and does the same. Now a lot of guys complain about that behavior – usually because they were stupid and didn’t use that instinct for their benefit and now they are stuck paying for something that is gone – pretty stupid deal…

    Don’t blame women for being that way – blame yourself for not using it to your advantage. :)

  38. Farm Boy

    Don’t blame women for being that way – blame yourself for not using it to your advantage.

    There is the issue of civilization, and its continuance.

  39. Farm Boy

    In the modern scenario, Stepdad Bear did all he could but, Mama Bear was never satisfied.

    Fuzzie,

    That story seems familiar. Obviously it was not lifted from a sitcom, as they can never make a female look bad. Doesn’t sound like a RomCom either.

  40. an observer

    Leblanc,

    I have nieces. The hamster is strong in them. But where are the hamster herders?

    Fuzzie,

    Papa bear has access to the internet. He logs on to red bear sites and learns game.

    Soon he stops the picnic baskets, becomes badass jerk bear and is rolling in fur. He lives bearily ever after. The end.

  41. sunshinemary Post author

    Then of course, the daughter is smarter than the father and ends up proving him wrong. Have you ever noticed the trend in children’s shows to make children more intelligent than the parents? Harry Potter does the same thing, (love the shows) but they make the kids more intelligent than the adults.

    Yes, I too have noticed that. The Harry Potter books are particularly awful because not only are the children smarter than the adults, but they lie constantly and it’s not portrayed as being wrong ever.

  42. sunshinemary Post author

    @ RPSMF
    Your story was clever and I got a laugh from it, but your conclusion isn’t quite right because it doesn’t distinguish between true religion – Jesus Christ – and the false religion of churchianity.

  43. Farm Boy

    Mommy bear lives in ex-husband bears house (who lives alone in a cave, on the wrong side of the river). He has to bring weekly picnic baskets for mommy bear to eat.

    And if he doesn’t, a game officer comes by and shoots him with a tranquilizer dart. He is then caged up and hauled away.

    Eventually he is released, but he has to wear a radio collar so that the game officer knows exactly where is at all times. And he is forced to operate in poor hunting grounds that he is not allowed to leave.

  44. Farm Boy

    Or perhaps the bear becomes BGTOW. Stays in the cave, and plays Big White Man Hunt, where he tracks, outruns and eats white men.

    You see, even video games for bears must be politically correct.

  45. FuzzieWuzzie

    Farm Boy,
    Observer and I have been working on the scenario.

    Observer,
    I like your ending! Downtrodden Papa Bear lives well and laughs last.

    Redpillsetmefree,
    When you said “big picture”, I take that to mean the cadre of wolves hasn’t shown up yet.
    Applying this to the real world would mean a societqal collapse. “Wolves” indeed!

    Sunshine Mary,
    In Redpill’s story, the “Shepherd” made me think of Pastor Marc Driscoll. Ironically, this time I could have agreed with him. If the “Shepherd” were David, son of Jesse, the story never would have got off the ground. Funny looking ewe would have been nailed with his sling. However, Jesus Christ doesn’t seem to be written in.

  46. FuzzieWuzzie

    Farm Boy,
    “A Tale of Two Sheep”
    “It was the best of times. It was the worst of times>”
    Beta Ram: “Tis a far, far better thing than I have ever done before.”

  47. grey_whiskers

    @Farm Boy November 20, 2013 at 12:39 pm

    FW,

    Maybe you could update the Three Bears, with Baby Mama Bear, her Thugspawn, and her live-in boyfriend

    Doesn’t putting Goldilocks in the role of a Carousel rider make more sense?
    “This one’s too hard, this one’s too soft, this one’s *just right*” :-)

  48. redpillsetmefree

    @ RPSMF
    Your story was clever and I got a laugh from it, but your conclusion isn’t quite right because it doesn’t distinguish between true religion – Jesus Christ – and the false religion of churchianity.

    If the “Shepherd” were David, son of Jesse, the story never would have got off the ground. Funny looking ewe would have been nailed with his sling. However, Jesus Christ doesn’t seem to be written in.

    The discerning reader will recognize that that writing choice was on purpose, and part of the point; rams must be careful as to which Shepherd they receive their counsel from. And also, since I have to spell it out, if you don’t know Jesus, it won’t occur to you that Jesus is missing.

    Sunshine Mary,
    In Redpill’s story, the “Shepherd” made me think of Pastor Marc Driscoll. Ironically, this time I could have agreed with him.

    *Look of shock* Don’t you =always= agree with me?
    And Driscoll. Yikes. From Homeschool Overlord to Cauldron in less than thirty days.

  49. redpillsetmefree

    Redpillsetmefree,
    When you said “big picture”, I take that to mean the cadre of wolves hasn’t shown up yet.
    Applying this to the real world would mean a societal collapse. “Wolves” indeed!

    Indeed, we’re in the phase where the wayward ewes are getting their orgy on, but the wolf of feminism has been unmasked. There just hasn’t been enough widespread ewe damage to trigger the rest of the story en masse, but the prodigal ewes do return in their 30s, and man-up-and-marry-those-sluts is indeed the Churchianity shepherd’s message, for many beta rams.

  50. an observer

    guarantee that a LOT of women will be interested in you

    Many contemporary women are like petulant children. Loads of entitlement, high expectations and like an untrained pet, requiring constant instruction and close guidance via game.

    Pass.

  51. FuzzieWuzzie

    Redpill,
    I mentioned Marc Driscoll because even a broken clock is right twice a day. It was for grins.

    Grey_Whiskers,
    Goldilocks’ role is not needed in the new edition.

  52. an observer

    Goldilocks eats every bowl of carbs, scoffs the coffee with added cream, and settles in to watch Oprah.

    When the bears come to the door, she rings 911 and the white knights turn up to take them away for questioning.

    I think i need more coffee myself…..

  53. FuzzieWuzzie

    Observer,
    You would have thought the cops would have asked what Goldilocks was doing in the Bear family house. It’s not like she can say she’s a relative.
    Coffe? Maybe later some Sleepytime herb tea. The pictures on the box are comforting.

    Ladies,
    We have hijacked your thread but, we’re having too much fun with it to give it back.

  54. Cail Corishev

    Glad you enjoyed my comment. For stories that teach good sense, another good source is Greek mythology and old fables (pre-Disney, at least). There’s a lot of red-pill truth to be found there, about men and women and many other topics.

    [ssm: Yes, good suggestions. We have a book of Greek mythology that is appropriate for grade-schoolers and read from it regularly.]

  55. Farm Boy

    You would have thought the cops would have asked what Goldilocks was doing in the Bear family house.

    You are just saying that because you are a bear.

    Human females are always right

  56. theshadowedknight

    The Shepherd also had dogs; large, hairy, and scary, but friendly enough for all that. The dogs were trained to guard the ewes and attack the wolves. After such a long time the wolves stopped coming around, and the Shepherd forgot why. The ewes enjoyed their safety, but the dogs were scary and they would nip at the sheep to keep them in line. The Shepherd saw this and so he would beat the dogs when they were hard on the sheep.

    After so long, the dogs stayed away from the sheep, further and further. The wolves noticed, and returned to hunt the sheep. That was how the wolf got so close, and how the ewes escaped. The Shepherd was so angry that he began to beat the dogs harder than he ever had, until one day they had enough. The Shepherd raised his hand against them, and many dogs bit him and ran away. Some of the dogs ran into the woods and lived wild and free and some joined the wolves. Then even when the ewes returned, the dogs no longer guarded them. They had to sit in the dark, fearful of the wolves.

    Beat a dog long enough, and even the most loyal will bite.

    The Shadowed Knight

  57. feeriker

    A big part of the wolf allure to the ewes is that not ALL ewes get eaten. If the fatality rate was 100 percent, none of the sheep would ever even think about leaving their pens. Clever creatures, wolves, but it’s essential to remember that sheep are extraordinarily stupid.

  58. nightskyradio

    an observer – But where are the hamster herders?

    A couple weeks ago, Allie and I saw a guy standing by the road holding a sign claiming he was an out of work hamster herder. No joke. If I hadn’t been driving I would’ve taken a pic.

    [ssm: LOL, art imitates life sometimes...]

  59. Morris

    Shadowed Night: “Beat a dog long enough, and even the most loyal will bite.”

    That whole story was a very good parable of truth. :)

  60. Just Saying

    “Don’t blame women for being that way – blame yourself for not using it to your advantage”.
    @Farm Boy: There is the issue of civilization, and its continuance.

    Civilization is doomed. It has been for years – when non-producers and idiots began changing the field to make their life easier at my expense. All of my life I have heard this non-sense – and I used to believe it till I opened my eyes and saw that it is a small group of men (smaller all the time) – the producers – which shoulder ALL of the burden by trying to play by the rules. Men are supposed to “sacrifice for the good of others” – I just say NO… I am just a cog if I play by the rules, but by not playing by them – I live much better than I could otherwise. So why would I want to play by the rules, and get no rewards?

    I am a firm believer in “Atlas Shrugged” – civilization is doomed, so I will help it along as much as I can – use it to your advantage. Stop trying to be ATLAS! So as far as civilization – I really couldn’t care less. Continuance… The sooner it fails the better in my book.

  61. earl

    “So why would I want to play by the rules, and get no rewards?”

    Depends on which life you want your rewards to be.

    “Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal.”

    Matthew 6: 19-20

  62. earl

    Keep in mind I’m not talking playing by the rules of corrupt leadership…but you still have to obey their laws. Only when they force you to do something that doesn’t line up with God’s way of thinking…do you stand up for yourself. Many men with huge balls did this in the Old Testiment…they would rather die than support corrupt laws. I find that admirable.

    Women…don’t ever play by their rules. They don’t even know what they are and they’ll change based off their cycle.

    However…playing by your own rules without any moral ground as a foundation is just asking for trouble. God only has 10 (which Jesus shorten to two) rules to live by….you are free to do what you want staying within those boundries. How many rules does the government have?

  63. Pingback: A Parable on Women

  64. Je Suis Prest

    As for Golilocks, you must unlearn what you have learned. Misunderstood was she. Guilt, accountability, consideration for others, from the Patriarchy these are. Hmph, inner peace. Heh. Godliness. Heh. A Feminist craves not these things. You must learn to let go of your thirst for logic. Your desire for justice. Only then will you truly see how wonderful feminism is.

  65. alcestiseshtemoa

    Did you create this tale of “Two Sheep” SSM, or was it passed down to you as a heritage? Anyways, it’s a good cautionary tale. Almost like a dark, grimm fairy tale detailing real life experiences into a fable. The whole contents, the shepherd, the sheep, the narrow gate, the barnyard, and the wolves, are woven together into a lovely story. Well done.

  66. Pingback: Lightning Round – 2013/11/27 | Free Northerner

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